Keep Your Basement or Foundation Dry With Sump Pump Repair in Dayton, OH

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It seems we use an amazing number of devices to keep our homes dry and comfortable. Some homeowners with houses in high water areas or basements that tend to gather excess water make use of a drainage system designed around a sump pump. This pump’s primary purpose is to remove excess water that collects in the sump pit. The pit is basically a holding area, and once the water reaches a certain level, a switch is triggered that turns the pump on. Like any motorized system, the pump can break down through motor wear, switch wear or by failure of the pump itself. Likewise, the pump or line can clog, causing the water to flow back into the sump pit and overflow.

The sump pump itself is a fairly simple system that only needs routine maintenance as long as the system is not routinely overloaded. This maintenance includes checking the sump pump pit for trash and cleaning any filter that may be attached to the pump. You should also check the float. This is the device that senses the water level in the sump pit and triggers the pumping action. The easiest way to check the float is to pour some water into the pit so the float rises and the pump turns on. However, if water is standing in the pit, you may want to call for Sump Pump Repair in Dayton, OH such as that provided by the experts at Complete Plumbing.

The next test is the check valve. If you have placed water into the pit and the pump starts, but the water simply returns, then the check valve may need to be replaced or cleaned. This valve is typically in the outflow line. If the pump kicks on, but no water is removed or the pump makes strange noises, you may have a problem with the impeller. The impeller is typically a rotor on the bottom of the pump, which spins to suck the water from the sump pit. This is also a case where it may be best to contact someone skilled in sump pump repair in Dayton OH. If the pump fails to switch on at all, your first test is to verify the electricity to the pump itself. Many pumps are wired directly into the home’s electric wires, but some have been outfitted with a plug for quick access.

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